JCMF
JCMF

Gallery: Places Associated with JCM

Glenlair:  Glenlair, circa 1880 after enlargement by
James Clerk Maxwell.

Glenlair House, near Corsock in Dumfries & Galloway,
was the country home of the Clerk Maxwell family.

Courtesy of the Cavendish Laboratory,
University of Cambridge.

Glenlair distant:  Distant view of Glenlair.

Courtesy of the Cavendish Laboratory,
University of Cambridge.

Glenlair front:  Front elevation of Glenlair.

Courtesy of the Cavendish Laboratory,
University of Cambridge.

Glenlair ruins (1):  Glenlair in ruins - long after the destructive fire of 1929. 
The taller part to the left is the extension which was the
result of an 1868 collaboration between JCM and
Dumfries architect James Barbour (1834-1912). 

On the right is the 1831 original house built by JCM's
father, John Clerk Maxwell, in collaboration with
Dumfries  architect Walter Newall (1780-1863).

Courtesy of the Cavendish Laboratory,
University of Cambridge.

Glenlair ruins (2):  Distant view of Glenlair in ruins.

Courtesy of the Cavendish Laboratory,
University of Cambridge.

Glenlair 2009:  Glenlair House as it was in 2009.

The entrance porch has been restored and the
ruins stabilized by "The Maxwell at Glenlair Trust".

Glenlair 2014 (1):  Glenlair in 2014, the original house built for JCM's
father, on the right of the picture, has been rebuilt.

Courtesy of Captain Duncan Ferguson

Glenlair 2014 (2):  The reconstructed house, centre, within
the shell of the 1831 original Glenlair House.

Courtesy of Captain Duncan Ferguson

Ed Academy 1828:  JCM attended school at Edinburgh Academy
from 1841 to 1847.

From:
"Modern Athens! Displayed in a Series of Views"
by John Britton & Thomas Hosmer Shepherd, 1829

Ed Academy 2010:  This view shows remarkable little change
in external appearance from JCM's day.

31 Heriot Row:  Home of JCM's widowed Aunt Isabella Wedderburn (sister of his father). 

It was here at "old 31" that JCM stayed for much of his time while
studying at the Edinburgh Academy and Edinburgh University. 

Most of James' cousins were a good bit older than him, but he was
close to Isabella's daughter, Jemima, whose watercolours have
captured many scenes in JCM's young life.

Stairwell at 31:  The young JCM and his cousin Jemima are reputed
to have experimented with hot air balloons In this
four storey stairwell. 

Jemima has recorded, in watercolour, similar
experiments involving hot air balloons at Killearn
(the estate of her future father-in-law, John Blackburn).

This stairwell is now access to the flat of Angus Reid,
artist and poet.  In this view we see part of Reid's
installation "Domecstatic", larger-than-life silhouettes are
framed by four poems that seek company as they climb
towards the light. 

Photo courtesy of Angus Reid

Stairwell at 31:  Another view of the stairwell where JCM and
Jemima Wedderburn experimented with hot air
balloons.

It is good to see that there is an artistic continuity
from Jemima to the present day Angus Reid.

Photo courtesy of Angus Reid

6 Great Stuart St:  JCM's Aunt Jane Cay lived in a flat in this grand corner
building in the New Town. 

The Great Stuart St frontage is on the left of the picture. 

The young JCM often stayed with Aunt Jane when it was
not convenient to stay with Aunt Isabella.

© John Arthur

St Andrew's:  St Andrew's Church stands on the North side of
George Street, Edinburgh. 

Maxwell's statue now stands at the east end of the
street  (below the Melville monument seen in the
picture).

In the "The Life of James Clerk Maxwell", Campbell
and Garnett record that JCM attended two
churches whilst a pupil at the Edinburgh Academy:
“On Sundays he generally went with his father to
St. Andrew’s Church (Mr. Crawford’s) in the forenoon,
and, by Miss Cay’s desire, to St. John’s Episcopal
Chapel in the afternoon.”

From:
"Modern Athens! Displayed in a Series of Views"
by John Britton & Thomas Hosmer Shepherd, 1829

St John's 1845:  St John's Episcopal Church stands at the corner of
Princes Street and Lothian Road, Edinburgh

In the "The Life of James Clerk Maxwell", Campbell
and Garnett record that JCM attended two churches
whilst a pupil at the Edinburgh Academy:
“On Sundays he generally went with his father to
St. Andrew’s Church (Mr. Crawford’s) in the forenoon,
and, by Miss Cay’s desire, to St. John’s Episcopal
Chapel in the afternoon.”

Image from an old post card:
St John’s Chapel, Princes Street, from Castle Terrace.
Coloured lithograph by Nicol after W Mason, c.1845

St John's 2010:  Modern view of the church from Lothian Road.

St. John's Episcopal Church, Edinburgh
© Kim Traynor 2010
Creative Commons Attribution-
Share Alike 3.0 Unported licence

Old College:  Robert Adam's design of the east front of the
new building for the University of Edinburgh.

Engraved in 1791

Old College 1827:  East Front of the Old College, University of Edinburgh,
as it was built in 1827.

This is how it would have looked when JCM was there.

Old College today:  This is how the East Front of the Old College looks in the 21st Century. 

The dome, added in 1887, is similar to that in Adam's original design.

Courtesy of Jonathan Oldenbuck
GNU Free Documentation License

JCMB:  The James Clerk Maxwell Building houses the School
of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Edinburgh. 

It is situated at Peter Guthrie Tait Road on the King's
Buildings science campus.

Designed by Hardie Glover of Basil Spence,
Glover & Ferguson and erected in 1966.

© Graeme Smith 2010
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 licence

Marischal 1850s:  The courtyard of Marischal College, Aberdeen, as it was
when James Clerk Maxwell was appointed as Professor
of Natural Philosophy in 1856.

Marischal 2006:  The courtyard of Marischal College Aberdeen in the 21st century. 

Note the Mitchell Tower, erected in 1895 on the original lower tower.

Cavendish Lab:  A modern view of the front of the original
Cavendish Laboratory in Free School Lane, Cambridge.

The Cavendish opened in 1874 under the direction
of James Clerk Maxwell, the University's first
Cavendish Professor of Experimental Physics.

Photograph by David Peacock

Cavendish back:  A modern view of the rear of the original Cavendish Laboratory
in Cambridge. 

Photograph courtesy of Dr Isobel Falconer
Creative Commons Attribution-
ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Scroope Terrace:  Scroope Terrace, Trumpington Street, Cambridge

It was here, at No. 11 (at the far end of the terrace)
that James Clerk Maxwell lived while director of the
Cavendish Laboratory.

Photograph courtesy of Dr Isobel Falconer
Creative Commons Attribution-
ShareAlike 4.0 International License

JCM Statue (1):  Statue of James Clerk Maxwell by Alexander
"Sandy" Stoddart, Her Majesty's Sculptor in
Ordinary in Scotland.

Alex Fergusson, presiding officer of the Scottish
Parliament, speaking after unveiling the statue.

George Street, Edinburgh, 25th November 2008.

Courtesy of The Royal Society of Edinburgh

JCM Statue (2):  25th November 2008, a crowd gathered
around the statue of JCM in George Street,
Edinburgh following the unveiling.

Courtesy of The Royal Society of Edinburgh

The JCM Foundation is a charity formed in Scotland in 1977. (Registered Charity SC015003)
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